Mark Hominick's Blogs

  • Podcast: Mark Hominick, Marcus Luer By: Sherdog.com Staff

    The Sherdog Radio Network "Rewind" hits you with an early edition this week to rock to during your holiday travels.

    In The Sitdown, Jack Encarnacao is joined by beloved and grizzled MMA veteran Mark Hominick, who called it a career after his fourth consecutive loss at UFC 154 in November. From his boyhood playing street hockey to blossoming into a guaranteed exciting MMA fighter under late mentor Shawn Tompkins, "The Machine" goes in-depth on the highs and lows of his fighting life, and the example he wants to set for others in retirement.

    Also, in the "Down to Business" segment, everything you need to know about this year's New Year's Eve fight card in Saitama Super Arena in Japan. Jack interviews Marcus Luer, managing director of Glory Sports International, which in addition to presenting a K-1 Grand Prix-style kickboxing tournament on New Year's Eve, has also licensed the well-known DREAM brand for an afternoon bill of MMA bouts featuring Shinya Aoki, Phil Baroni, Tatsuya Kawajiri, and others. Luer answers all the burning questions about what happened to the Japanese fight scene, and what rebuilding it require.

    Better know MMA. Download the Rewind. And Happy Holidays!

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  • Poll: Mark Hominick’s Future



    Follow the jump for reader comments.

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  • Podcast: Mark Hominick By: Jared Koll

    TJ de Santis and Jared Koll were back Friday for another edition of 'Beatdown.' on The Sherdog Radio Network.

    Joining them was UFC featherweight Mark Hominick to discuss his upcoming bout with Eddie Yagin at href="http://www.sherdog.com/events/UFC-145-Atlanta-20031">UFC 145.

    'The Machine' also discussed the passing of his longtime friend and trainer, Shawn Tompkins, his first year of fatherhood, and training with the Jeff Curran.

    Check out "Beatdown" here.

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  • Hominick on Hioki: I’d Fight That Guy in a Backyard By: Sherdog.com Staff

    Mark Hominick, on “Beatdown,” discussing whether he’d like to fight Hatsu Hioki (Pictured) a third time:

    “For sure. I’d fight that guy in a backyard. That’s one guy who really gets my blood going. It’s in a competitive way. He’s got two wins over me. There’s no way I wouldn’t want to erase those wins. He’s an amazing competitor with an amazing skill set. I’m just thrilled that he’s in the UFC. … I’ve just got a lot more confidence on the ground [since their previous fights]. I’ve continually improved my wrestling, continually worked on my jiu-jitsu. I’m just a lot more confident down there [on the ground]. I’d be confident to go anywhere with him and put him away.”

    Follow the jump for reader comments.

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  • Podcast: Jackson, Hominick By: Luca Fury

    Live radio was back Monday with new episodes of "Beatdown" and "The SDS." Jon Luther and myself returned the The SRN Monday for a new edition of "Beatdown." Joining us was Mark Hominick to talk about his upcoming fights against Chan Sung Jung at UFC 140. We also took listener calls, emails and tweets.

    Greg Savage and Jeff Sherwood returned to The Sherdog Radio Network for a new episode of "The Savage Dog Show." Joining them was Greg Jackson to talk about his teams big night at this past weekend's TUF 14 Finale. The two men also took listener calls, emails and tweets.

    Check out the shows and our archives by clicking here.

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  • Gutsy Stand Makes ‘Machine’ a Star By: Jason Probst



    A star was born at UFC 129. | Photo: Sherdog.com



    Hollywood could not have scripted it any better. Hometown challenger takes on a great champion, absorbs a beating early, becomes horribly disfigured, and, then, after being waved clear to continue in a tense-as-tense-can-be doctor exam, rallies huge down the stretch to put the champion on his heels.

    Mark Hominick is truly worthy of being nicknamed “The Machine,” but what’s next for Jose Aldo, the still-amazing but now-human featherweight king?

    Honestly, with Hominick’s performance at UFC 129 on Saturday in Toronto, I’d rather see Aldo and him fight later. That’s because Hominick performed so impressively that a loss in the short-term will not hurt his long-term marketability for a title shot, especially against Aldo. Hominick might be wrestled and held down against tough contenders like Chad Mendes, but in a five-round standup battle, he is bad news for anyone. I’m not sure there is anyone else who can say that presently.

    Kenny Florian is dropping to 145 pounds and taking on Diego Nunes at UFC 131, but that is a real wild card. Florian may be venturing into Joe Riggs/James Irvin territory with this weight cut, given that he has fought as a globbed-up welterweight and, later, a finely tuned lightweight. We’ll have to see how he handles the drop in poundage.

    Previous Aldo opponents do not have Hominick’s kickboxing background, and, as such, it is a lot harder to absorb the big shots he did, especially early, when Aldo was digging a liver punch-leg kick combination with the kind of viciousness that makes you flinch. Hominick has formally earned an “anytime” invite on my pay-per-view wish list and yours, too.

    Aldo may have been sluggish from the weight cut, but he showed serious skill in handling it as he tired. Despite looking fatigued by the second round, his hard wiring still allowed him to parcel out big shots and keep slipping in some breathtaking sequences. Technically, this was a two-way, five-round masterpiece of ebb and flow, one that has few equals.

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  • UFC ‘Fight for the Troops 2’ Analysis: The Main Card By: Tim Leidecker



    Patrick Barry (top) file photo | Sherdog.com



    On Saturday, the UFC put on its second “Fight for the Troops” show to support severely wounded military personnel. While the first event in December of 2008 had many former U.S. Armed Forces members on the fight card itself, that theme was dropped this time around. Instead, “FFTT2” mostly featured the lighter weight classes, with plenty of 135-, 145-, and 155-pound action alongside a pair of heavyweight bouts.

    Below, an in-depth look at Saturday’s five main card matches and which fights are likely to be made in the near future for the 10 participants.

    Matt Wiman def. Cole Miller -- Decision (Unanimous)

    What happened: Long known only as a very confident -- perhaps overconfident -- contestant from “The Ultimate Fighter” Season 5, Wiman effectively emancipated himself from his “Handsome” moniker by turning in a career-defining performance over fellow “TUF 5” alum Cole Miller. From the opening bell, both men fought in the way one would want two fighters in the UFC’s ultra-competitive 155-pound division to engage. Midway through the opening round, Miller lost interest in standing and trading with Wiman, who was getting the better of their exchanges. Miller instead tried to pull guard, but was slammed to the mat for his efforts.

    Over the next two rounds, Wiman continued to use his strength advantage and tenaciously came after Miller, putting tons of pressure on the American Top Team fighter with vicious ground-and-pound.

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  • WEC 51 Postmortem: Eight not Enough for Aldo, Torres Revived By: Jake Rossen



    Jose Aldo file photo: Sherdog.com


    Every time I see Jose Aldo perch himself on the top of the cage and perform a back-flip, I cringe.

    It would be an incredible waste of ability to see the guy trip, fall, or land in a way that interrupts what’s becoming a very notable career. The commissions might want to consider fixing that, possibly by shooing offenders off with brooms.

    Maybe Aldo is putting himself in a little bit of trouble with the acrobatics because he’s not getting too nervous in the fight itself. For the eighth consecutive time in the WEC, Aldo more or less made a meal out of an opponent, stunning Manny Gamburyan with an uppercut Thursday and then knocking him unconscious with ground and pound. Gamburyan had no chance of getting him down and failed to discover any tricks for getting inside Aldo’s range. Has the guy ever even been in radical trouble? If he has, it hasn’t been worth remembering.

    Every time a dominant champion is established, the same question comes up: do audiences like seeing a man operating clearly above his competition, or do they grow bored if the suspense is leaking out of the bouts? Considering the purpose of titles is to find the best, it makes more sense that people would enjoy a clear and concise answer. Aldo is providing it.

    The follow-up: when champions are this dominant, do they get too complacent? Anderson Silva, with 12 wins in the Octagon, has turned in several bizarre performances; Georges St. Pierre walked into a fight with Matt Serra giving him only the same respect fans did, which wasn’t much. If Aldo ever develops similar boredom, he’s vulnerable. If he insists on using the cage as a pommel horse, he might one day feel very stupid. Either way, Aldo’s biggest threat in the WEC’s featherweight division will probably remain himself.

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