Dream ‘Genki Desu Ka!’ Results and Play-by-Play

Dec 30, 2011
Sherdog.com will report from the Saitama Super Arena in Saitama, Japan at approximately 1 a.m. ET with play-by-play and live results of Dream's ‘Fight for Japan: Genki Desu Ka!’, which features three Dream title bouts, and is headlined by a heavyweight clash between Fedor Emelianenko and 2008 Olympic gold medalist Satoshi Ishii.

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Dream Bantamweight Grand Prix Reserve Bout
Hideo Tokoro vs. Yusup Saadulaev


Round 1
Tokoro bolts across the ring with a flying knee and lands atop Saadulaev on the ground. They scramble to their feet and Saadulaev grabs a rear waistlock. He lifts Tokoro into the air and slams him down awkwardly on his head, knocking the Japanese fighter out cold. Saadulaev punches him a few times before referee Moritaka Oshiro realizes what’s happened. It’s a knockout win for Yusup Saadulaev at 42 seconds of round one.

Dream Bantamweight Grand Prix Semifinal
Antonio Banuelos vs. Masakazu Imanari


Round 1
The smaller Banuelos keeps his distance and deflects hard kicks to the body while Imanari circles. The “Ashikan Judan” shoots and is stuffed by Banuelos, who socks his opponent one for his trouble. Imanari charges again and gets caught off balance with a punch; Banuelos won’t follow to the ground. Banuelos blocks a head kick, comes forward and barely touches Imanari with a right when the leglock specialist flops to guard again. Banuelos steps away. Imanari shoots and gets denied again with 90 seconds left in the opening frame. Banuelos lands leg kicks inside and out but is still having trouble putting his hands on Imanari’s chin. Imanari tries to pull guard as Banuelos comes in to punch and fails again to bring the fight to the ground. Banuelos times a jumping knee and drills Imanari with a counterpunch, just misses with an axe kick and again steps away from the guard-pulling Imanari.

Round 2
Imanari wastes no time in trying to pull guard and this time is met by Banuelos’ hammerfists. Imanari is falling down after nearly every glancing blow, trying to lure Banuelos into his domain. Banuelos bites and winds up in Imanari’s closed guard, though only for a matter of seconds. With three minutes to go, this could still be either man’s fight. Referee Samio Kimura pauses the bout to ask for more action from both bantamweights, though it’s really Imanari to blame for the lack of engagement. Imanari pulls Banuelos into his closed guard again and immediately looks to pull rubber guard. Banuelos busts out of it, but Imanari has his left arm trapped. The WEC veteran extracts the limb and drops some ground-and-pound on Imanari as the fight enters its last minute. Imanari twists and scoops the leg of Banuelos to sweep on top, then drops back for a leglock. Banuelos has it sized up and puts Imanari on his back again, and that’s where it ends.

Official result: Judge Gen Isono sees the bout in favor of Imanari, while judges Hikaru Adachi and Akira Shoji side with the winner by split decision and first Dream 2011 world bantamweight grand prix finalist, Antonio Banuelos.

Dream Bantamweight Grand Prix Semifinal
Bibiano Fernandes vs. Rodolfo Marques Diniz


Round 1
Fernandes comes inside with leg kicks and ducks a punch from Marques. The Nova Uniao product is trapped in a corner, trying to strike his way out when he’s dumped to the ground by a Fernandes double-leg. Fernandes leans from left to right across Marques, dropping hard elbows to the body of his countryman. They remain in this position, Marques clinging to a deep half-guard, until Fernandes postures up with just over a minute remaining in the round. The former Dream featherweight champ keeps the short punches coming, but it’s not enough for referee Akira Shoji, who stands them up with 30 seconds to go. That’s where the round ends.

Round 2
Fernandes quickly pressures Marques into a ring post and gets busy with knees up the middle. Marques looks toward referee Shoji, seeming to indicate that a strike strayed low. No action is taken immediately, but Shoji warns Fernandes to keep the knees up when he splits them moments later. Fernandes tags Marques with a looping right hand, misses with a flying knee and gets tied up with a single-leg try. Marques can only hold Fernandes in the corner until Shoji breaks them up with three minutes left. Marques dips inside again, drives a knee up the middle and separates. Fernandes tries to clinch in the middle of the ring and gets underhooked into a post. Marques stalls out again and is shoved away. This is Fernandes’ fight to lose with 90 seconds on the clock, and he’s keeping himself ahead with chopping leg kicks down the stretch. A big left connects for Fernandes and he tries for a takedown behind it. Marques turns it around and puts “Bibi” in a corner to finish the fight.

Official result: Judges Hikaru Adachi, Gen Isono and Kenichi Serizawa unanimously award the win to Bibiano Fernandes, sending him through to meet Antonio Banuelos in the tournament final.

Hayato Sakurai vs. Ryo Chonan

Round 1
The fighters circle and trade kicks before a swiping left from Sakurai catches Chonan. Sakurai pounces on his stumbling opponent and works from the half-guard of the “Piranha.” Sakurai is being kept at bay with Chonan’s butterfly guard, offering sparse ground-and-pound as he works to pass half-guard on Chonan’s left. “Mach” gets side control and Chonan tries to knee from his back, then turns to his side and pops to his feet. Chonan lands an outside thigh kick, sticks a jab in Sakurai’s face. Now Sakurai rushes Chonan into the ropes and just holds him there for the last 40 seconds of the round.

Round 2
Sakurai ties up in the middle of the ring and trips Chonan down with double underhooks. He leans from left to right on Chonan and drops a few short punches while Chonan throws more knees from his back. Sakurai gives Chonan a couple knees to the body in return and the men are repositioned away from the ropes. Sakurai goes to mount and gets stuffed back to half-guard, then full guard. Chonan throws punches off his back and misses with an upkick, standing just as the bell sounds.

Round 3
Sakurai lands an outside thigh kick and puts a pair of punches on Chonan, who keeps moving forward with low kicks. A Chonan jab snaps back Sakurai’s head, followed by a hard left. Sakurai’s left hook finds its way to Chonan’s ribs, Mach moving in soon behind it to hold Chonan on the ropes again. Chonan gets going with a crisp left hook to the face, then one to the body. They wade into one another’s range to throw bombs, but nothing’s landing flush. Sakurai is moving backwards and Chonan moves in to slug; Sakurai wraps him up on the ropes and they’re soon restarted. Sakurai is cut beneath his right eye and looking increasingly gassed as Chonan pours on punches. When Sakurai plows Chonan to the ground with 90 seconds to go, it’s Chonan flailing away with punches off his back. Sakurai hops into mount with 50 seconds left and Chonan gives up his back in a bid to escape. Chonan is able to flip around and put his back on the mat, but he’s stuck under Sakurai and taking knees to the body. Chonan reverses just before the bell, then the two banged-up veterans grin and embrace.

Official result: Judges Hikaru Adachi, Gen Isono and Akira Shoji unanimously see the bout in favor of Hayato Sakurai.

Tatsuya Kawajiri vs. Kazuyuki Miyata

Round 1
Kawajiri gets off first with a leg kick and a jab, fakes a takedown attempt and then goes for a double-leg. He dumps Miyata down along the ropes and triangles the legs, trying to flatten out “Little Hercules.” Miyata is keeping a wide open full guard and Kawajiri looks to step into mount. The “Crusher” gets on top halfway through the round and flattens out Miyata. The position doesn’t allow Kawajiri to drop much offense, especially with Miyata wrapping his arms around his opponent. Kawajiri puts some palm strikes on Miyata’s temple and tries to break the defense by slamming him into the canvas. Miyata’s grip breaks and Kawajiri instantly goes for an arm-triangle choke. It’s a deep one, but time is running out and Miyata is saved by the bell.

Round 2
Miyata leaps in with a knee and the men get tangled up along the ropes. Kawajiri leads with a front kick and follows with a winding uppercut. After being clipped by a pair of Miyata punches, Kawajiri bowls his man down with another double-leg in the middle of the ring. Kawajiri moves between full- and half-guard until Miyata powers back to his feet with three minutes remaining. They tie up with over-unders and Miyata scores with some solid knees before they tumble to the ground. Miyata jumps on Kawajiri’s back but he’s having trouble sinking the second hook. Kawajiri shakes him over his right shoulder and they’re back to clinching on the feet. Ref Moritaka Oshiro splits them up with just over a minute to go. Kawajiri leads with an uppercut to the body and gets a takedown behind it. Miyata is struggling to retain half-guard and gets trapped in the arm-triangle again with 30 seconds left. This time, Kawajiri is in full side control and Miyata has nowhere to go. The tap comes at 4:54 of the second round, giving Tatsuya Kawajiri a submission victory.

Megumi Fujii vs. Karla Benitez

Round 1
Fujii snaps off some kicks, aborts a double-leg shot, then falls to her back underneath Benitez in search of a leglock. Benitez follows to the ground and Fujii instantly sweeps to the top. “Mega Megu” stands over Benitez, goes straight to side control and latches on to Benitez’s left arm. Fujii rolls her over and Benitez is stuck with the grappling ace bending her elbow the wrong way. After a moment of hesitation, Benitez taps out at the 75-second mark of round one.

K-1/MMA Mixed Rules
Yuichiro Nagashima vs. Katsunori Kikuno


Round 1 (K-1 Rules)
It’s a firefight early on with both men standing in the pocket and slugging away. Nagashima finds a home for a few hard left hooks, but seconds later he hits the deck courtesy of a right straight from Kikuno. He makes it back up to meet the referee’s count, but the karateka Kikuno is relentless, bombarding the dazed Jienotsu with punches against the ropes. Nagashima takes everything Kikuno has to offer and eventually catches Kikuno with a counter left, with only seconds left in the round. His face swelling up, Kikuno gets back to his feet and finishes the standup portion of the bout.

Round 2 (MMA Rules)
Kikuno walks into a punch from Nagashima to take the kickboxer’s back standing. Nagashima shakes him and tries to throw long punches, keeping his distance. Kikuno walks him down, trying to clinch and knee, then bombing over the top with punches. Kikuno gets another rear waistlock and this time drags Jienotsu to the ground. Nagashima is on his belly with both of Kikuno’s hooks in. Kikuno bangs away with about 20 clean rights, seemingly knocking out Nagashima and waking him back up before the fight is halted at the 2:34 mark.

Dream Bantamweight Grand Prix Final
Antonio Banuelos vs. Bibiano Fernandes


Round 1
Fernandes walks down Banuelos and the American explodes out with punches. A high kick and right hook from Fernandes have Banuelos looking for escape, but he falls on his way to the other side of the ring. Fernandes smells blood and pounces, unloading 20 or more fast punches on the dazed Banuelos and forcing referee Kenichi Serizawa to intervene. Bibiano Fernandes becomes Dream’s inaugural bantamweight champion with a stoppage of Antonio Banuelos at 1:21 of round one.

Dream Featherweight Championship
Hiroyuki Takaya vs. “Lion Takeshi” Inoue


Round 1
Lots of heavy pawing early with Takaya coming forward. He cracks Inoue with a hard left kick to the body, and doubles up on his jab. Inside low kick from Inoue, but Takaya responds with a left hook. The champion steps in with a low kick to the thigh, but the former Shooto champ whizzes two punches by his ear. Outside leg kick from the challenger. Takaya grabs the collar tie and cracks Inoue with a knee. Two left hooks and a jab land for Takaya, who is starting to operate effectively, though Lion continues to move away and try to counter. Takaya pumps his hands and ducks under an Inoue right hook, finishing a double-leg takedown just before the bell, ending a solid opening round for himself.

Round 2
Inoue kicks to the leg again, but Takaya counters once more. Takaya jacks Lion with two more right hands, and then lands another moments after. Takaya is the much more aggressive, successful fighter so far. Inoue grabs an ankle and tries to run Takaya into the ropes, but the “Streetfight Bancho” stays up. Takaya continues to move in, and Lion circles away again, prompting a quick warning from referee Yuji Shimada. Another big right cross for Takaya, and Lion is moving away with his hands down again. Lion clears the cobwebs, and pumps his jab in the champ’s face. Lion starting to put his hands out there, and when Takaya rushes him, he stuns him for a moment with the jab and right hand. Takaya wobbles for a minute and soldiers on after Inoue’s best punching of the fight. Takaya’s nose is bloodied from Inoue’s brief flurry. Outside low kick by Takaya is countered by Inoue’s right hand. “Evil Fist” lands another smacking body kick, audible through the venue. Two Takaya punches crack Inoue, but he switches up his strategy, clinching and taking Inoue down just before the bell again.

Round 3
Hard outside thigh kick for Takaya starts the bout, and Takaya shoots, putting Inoue on the mat once more and setting up in full guard. Lion shifts his hips, looking for butterfly hooks to push the champ away, but Takaya stays on top, throwing small hammerfists from full guard. Lion finally jumps up to his feet, but the champ races at him with a right-handed haymaker that glances. After a short respite to fix Takaya’s glove, the fight is back on, and Takaya’s outside thigh kick on Inoue’s left leg returns. Inoue’s right goes wide, and Takaya counters him with two quick rights of his own. Inoue continues to jab and bloody Takaya’s nose, but he isn’t finding power shots now. Inoue continues jabbing as Takaya blocks and kicks inside and outside on his lead left leg. Inoue is starting to look more ginger on his left leg now. Inoue continues to move away, but thwarts Takaya’s pre-bell takedown this time, holding him up in the corner until the round expires.

Round 4
The familiar pattern resumes in round four, as Takaya is stalking Inoue and repeatedly cracking him in the legs with kicks. Takaya feints, shoots a left cross, and snaps Lion’s head back. Takaya clinches and looks for a trip, and Inoue nearly counters with an uchi mata throw, but Takaya blocks it and they resume standing. Inside low kick for Takaya now cracks the right leg. Two nasty outside low kicks for Takaya, and one to the body. Lion continues to circle away from the forward-charging Takaya, and again, referee Yuji Shimada halts the action to reprimand him, this time handing him a yellow card. Inoue looked frustrated now, and on the restart, Takaya is all over him in the corner. Lion is swinging back, but Takaya is trapping him in the corners of the ring and pulverizing him. The bell rings after another Takaya cracker bobbles Inoue’s head.

Round 5
Lion tries to respond to Takaya’s low kicks with his own, but the champ moves to the Thai clinch inside and puts knees to his body. A long right-handed counter comes over Inoue’s jab, landing for Takaya. Takaya corners his foe again, and lands another double-leg, but can’t keep Inoue on the mat. Right cross-outside low kick scores for Takaya. Boos start to come in with two minutes to go. Inoue starts to step forward with the intent to land some offense, but Takaya continues to launch two- and three-punch salvos to keep him away. Left hook and a push kick land for Takaya. Double jab for Inoue lands, but he is hit with a pair of hooks from Takaya. Takaya swings back, stopping Inoue’s momentum before the bell. Consummate performance by Hiroyuki Takaya.

Official result: All three judges -- Hikaru Adachi, Matt Hume and Gen Isono -- award the bout to the winner by unanimous decision, and still Dream featherweight champion, Hiroyuki Takaya.

Dream Lightweight Championship
Shinya Aoki vs. Satoru Kitaoka


Round 1
Aoki quickly looks for a double-leg, but Kitaoka counters on the way down with a powerful guillotine. However, Aoki passes to the side, escaping the worst of the squeeze. Nonetheless, Kitaoka's enormous power has Aoki still in remote trouble from side control. However, the Dream champ escape, and in the blink of an eye, he's on Kitaoka's back. Kitaoka shakes him, but Aoki goes over the top and locks up a triangle. Aoki threatens with a farside kimura with the triangle, and when Kitaoka attempts to defend, Aoki pulls out a triangle armbar on the other side. Kitaoka escapes and grabs a front headlock, taking a minute to breathe after two minutes of intense grappling. Stood up in the corner, Aoki nearly reaps Kitaoka to the floor, but he blocks the attempt, and referee Moritaka Oshiro breaks them up. Aoki clinches and trips Kitaoka to the mat with just over a minute to work, staying close on top in half guard. Aoki lands some short, ineffective punches before the bell.

Round 2
Immediately, Aoki bulls into the clinch, gets double underhooks in the corner, and trips Kitaoka to the mat once more. Kitaoka kicks him away, but Aoki passes to half guard and sits right back on top. Kitaoka moves to butterfly hooks and tries to kick him away, but Aoki is all over him, keeping half guard and looking for the pass. Kitaoka pushes him away again, and when Aoki re-establishes, he tries some hammerfists from his back. Aoki tries to triangle over Kitaoka’s outstretched legs and pass right into mount, but Kitaoka shuts that down. Kitaoka is trying to elevate Aoki to get him off, but he just can’t shake the champion’s sensational top control. Palm slaps to the ear by Aoki, who is trying to cut through half guard and pass right into mount. Kitaoka looks for deep half guard, so Aoki cradles him, but the Pancrase rep explodes and regains half guard. The chess match continues until referee Moritaka Oshiro stands them up with just over a minute to go. On the feet, Aoki shows off his muay Thai training, smacking Kitaoka with lead kicks to the body. Aoki’s third hard roundhouse makes Kitaoka clinch, and Aoki puts him on the mat once more before the bell.

Round 3
Aoki gets the double collar-tie and neckwrestles with Kitaoka, landing knees for tripping him to the mat again. Aoki stands out of his guard in Ali-Inoki position, and when Kitaoka tries to get away, he dives on his back and sinks both hooks. Aoki continues to rotate grips, threatening with both his face crank and rear-naked choke, but Kitaoka does a good job of controlling Aoki’s far arm, and punching behind his shoulder. As Kitaoka looks to turn back into guard, Aoki tries to bait him into a triangle, but Kitaoka escapes and stands above him with the “Tobikan Judan” in the butt scoot. Moritaka Oshiro returns them to their feet, and quickly fixes Aoki’s glove. Aoki looks for another takedown, but can’t get it. Instead, he goes back to his standup, cracking Kitaoka with a right head kick before looking for a single-leg takedown in the corner. With 10 seconds to go, Oshiro breaks them, and Kitaoka goes flying at Aoki, who grabs his waist and puts him on the mat.

Round 4
A pair of body kicks by Aoki are mostly blocked, but when Kitaoka tries one of his own, Aoki cracks him with a clean one. Kitaoka drives inside, and Aoki gets his neck again, and this time cracks him with three knees. One stiff, clean knee forces Kitaoka to shoot, and Aoki is all over his b ack. Kitaoka’s nose is badly busted, perhaps on account of the knee. Aoki gets two rear-naked chokes nearly applied, but Kitaoka slips his chin under Aoki’s forearm and defends. He’s startling to gargle his own blood inadvertently, and Aoki grabs another choke that has him wheezing. Once more, Kitaoka gets his chin underneath and stops the choke attempt. Kitaoka rolls and goes belly down, but Aoki pulls him right back down and continues his grappling dominance. Kitaoka uses a two-on-one to defend Aoki’s choke, and the champ uses his free arm to punch Kitaoka in the face. Kitaoka gets locked in another rear-naked choke for a moment, but his face is so bloody that he’s able to turn his head into Aoki and abate the choke once more. The bell rings, ending a lopsided round for the increasingly-dominant Aoki.

Round 5
Kitaoka presses in on Aoki, and is taken down once more with Aoki quickly looking to advance position. Kitaoka turns away in half guard, exposing his back and baiting Aoki to pass. He acquiesces, and Aoki ends up with back mount once more with three minutes to go in the fight. Aoki’s forearm hovers dangerously close to Kitaoka’s neck, but the former Sengoku champ incredibly continues to fight the chokes despite how exhausted and outmatched he is. With just under two minutes to go, Kitaoka explodes into Aoki and regains his feet. Aoki wants the fight on the mat, and body locks and trips Kitaoka to the mat again. Aoki drives his shoulder into Kitaoka’s chest, and referee Moritaka Oshiro stands them up with approximately 45 seconds to fight. Stiff Aoki jabs land as the champion dances on the outside. Kitaoka swipes with a big right, but misses. Aoki shoots, and Kitaoka gets a headlock and lands a salvo of knees before the bell that makes the crowd roar. The fight ends with Aoki and the canvas smeared in the blood from Kitaoka's nose.

Official result: All three judges -- Hikaru Adachi, Matt Hume and Gen Isono -- award the bout to the winner by unanimous decision, and still Dream lightweight champion, Shinya Aoki.

Fedor Emelianenko vs. Satoshi Ishii

Round 1
Emelianenko stalking Ishii quickly, and he connects with an inside low kick. Surprisingly stiff left hand for Ishii lands. Emelianenko kicks and the former gold medalist gets his leg, but Emelianenko keeps his balance and gets him off. Another smacking low kick from Emelianenko before a right-hand follow. Inside low kick from Ishii this time. Emelianenko kicks low, and uses the low kicks to set up bigger combinations. He shoots a straight right through Ishii's guard that stumbles him but the Russian doesn't pounce. He coolly walks Ishii down, and throws another laser-guided right hand that crumples Ishii on the mat. Emelianenko simply stands there like stone, perhaps waiting for Ishii to regain his feet. When referee Yuji Shimada realizes that it isn't happening, he steps in immediately to rescue the fallen gold medalist. Fedor Emelianenko is the winner by knockout a 2:34 of the first round.

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